Drivers, be safer on the roads during this dangerous period

| Jun 16, 2021 | Accident Injury |

Are you planning a family vacation to soak up some sun at the shore? Or maybe you just want to while away a few hours at your prime fishing spot out of town. Regardless, summer is a time when many people are on the move.

Cooped up after a long winter and a very stressful and tedious prior year, individuals and families are taking to the roads in droves this summer, embracing their newly rediscovered freedom. But before you leave for that beach vacay or day trip — or even your daily commute — you should understand the dangers you now face are very real.

Welcome to the 100 deadliest days of summer

The approximate 100 days between the two bookends of summer, Memorial Day weekend in May and Labor Day in September, mark the deadliest time on the roads for teenage drivers to have accidents. The abundant free time away from school coupled with their inexperience and high spirits can put you, your family and the teens themselves right in the crosshairs of danger.

Industry experts weigh in

The spokesperson for AAA noted that in the past decade, over 140 individuals lost their lives during these same months in collisions with teenage drivers. Not all of the fatalities included teens, meaning that everyone with whom these neophyte drivers share the road also share the risk.

Why is the danger focused on this demographic group?

Picture a carload of laughing, high-spirited teens cruising down the highway. With the car filled to capacity, some are not belted in. Others are fiddling with the radio dial while another lowers the window to call out to a friend walking along the road. They joke, horseplay and engage with their cellphones.

But what they really are doing is distracting the driver from what should be their only mission: Safely navigating from Point A to Point B.

Injured by a distracted driver?

If you suffered injuries in an auto accident caused by a distracted driver, seeking compensation is your route to civil justice.

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